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2007 Sporrt Cub ip for Salvage on AIG

j3cub

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Aircraft: 2007 Cub Crafters Sport Cub, N475CC Serial No.: CC11-00031
Engine(s): Continental O-200-A Serial No.: 256322
Airframe: Approx 25 TT
Equipment: GTX 327, SL 40. The Garmin GPS is not included with the aircraft.
Propeller: damaged
Description of Accident: Lost control during an attempted landing.
Description of Damage: Damages consist of LH Wing, LH wing tip, spinner, lower cowling, upper cowling, fuselage, RH wing, RH wingtip, RH horizontal Stabilizer, rudder, RH Flap and propeller.
Location of Aircraft: Cubcrafters, Yakima, WA phone 509-248-1025 fax 509-853-2783
Remarks: Aircraft is dismantled. According to Cubcrafters, It is confirmed that the fuselage is not repairable as their engineering department has no alternate repair approved at this time. As such, this will require a complete replacement of the fuselage.
Inquiries(Contact): Seth Magid @ AIG Aviation 480-699-8485 [email protected]


http://www.aigaviation.com/salvage/N475CC/SalvageN475CC.aspx
 

N711

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For those wondering like me what actually happened, here is the NTSB report. Bottom line a Ground loop. Best Gary


NTSB Identification: SEA07CA192
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 30, 2007 in Palm Springs, CA
Aircraft: Cub Crafters Inc. CC11-100, registration: N475CC
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.
The pilot was landing the tailwheel-equipped airplane on runway 31R. During the landing, the airplane veered from the runway and groundlooped, resulting in substantial damage to the right wing. The pilot reported about 3,000 hours total time, with 30 hours in the airplane make and model. He stated that no mechanical malfunctions occurred to result in the loss of directional control.
 

newcub

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Could toe brakes be a factor in a CC landing accident?
 

will767

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I have many questions concerning the damage assessment of this a/c, In the first place the fuselage is according to Cub Crafters engineers irreparable. Looking at the photo's I couldn't see any wrinkles in the fabric of the fuselage. not that there isn't any, just that they didn't show up in the pictures.
The slightest wrinkle would indicate damage to the frame.
Next I question the structural integrity of the frame if a ground loop incident would render the fuselage irreparable. Is this an excuse by the Cub Crafters factory to sell a new frame? or do they not have a Jig to place the frame in to do the necessary tubing and or gear fitting replacement needed to fix this frame?
To me condemming this fuselage to the junk pile doesn't make much sense. Perhaps an engineer from the factory has some logical explanation. I would be interested to hear it. Jim Swayze
 
R

Richgj3

Guest
Jim

I think CC is just making a smart business decision. Why should they waste the time on this when they have real orders to fill? Also, they are better off from a liability perspective if this airplane "comes back as pots and pans" as we used to say after a 152 had a paticularly "hard" landing :D

The only fuselage damage I see is where the Landing gear tore out, but there may be more you can't see in the pics.

There have been a few Legends up on their noses so far, too, so I wouldn't blame it on toe brakes. These planes, like Huskys to some extent tend to be purchased by "first time tailwheel pilots" in some cases. My friend was a Husky dealer for a while. I have seen this movie before.

My age may be showing here, but I don't think most "newer" pilots know how to do a full stall landing or if they do, the last time they did one was on the checkride. I learned to fly in C150's off a grass airport. Every take off was soft field to save the nosewheel and every landing as full stall (unless the field was muddy, then it was soft field). When they got a cub to rent on the line I had 90 hrs TT and I checked out in it in 2 half hour sessions with a CFI. 40 years and 4000hrs later (2500 TW) I'm still waiting for the first ground loop. I'm sure it's waiting for me, too. ;D

Rich Giannotti
 

reileyr

WagAero J-3
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The standard CC11 hard rubber tailwheel makes directional control difficult on hard surface runways compared to the Bushwheel 3200 tailwheel. I have a couple thousand hours just in cubs and found the standard tailwheel very challenging to control without heavy braking. I change it out to the Bushwheel 3200 for a pleasant landing experience. Whichtailwheel does N475CC have? Richard
 

N711

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May I assume by the last email that you guys can see from the salvage pictures on line that this Sport Cub had the Standard Tail wheel vs the upgraded Bushwheel? Regards Gary
 
R

Richgj3

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Whichtailwheel does N475CC have? Richard
I don't think anybody made any assumtions. In any case the assumption I would make from those pictures is that the type of tailwheel doesn't matter if it's never on the ground.

Rich G
 

JimC

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>I have a couple thousand hours just in cubs and found the standard tailwheel very challenging to control without heavy braking.<

I&#039;m a low time pilot with only about 1300 hours in J3&#039;s, but I&#039;ve never found the tailwheel choice to matter on any surface but soft sand (where I prefer to use a small diameter, narrow tailwheel so I can use it at my discretion to plow the sand as a land anchor). Big tailwheels are useful for dry gumbo and rocks, but increase the length of the takeoff roll by reducing the deck angle on other surfaces. Re brakes, I&#039;ve not found them to be necessary for anything but holding the plane still during static runup and making extremely short landings. Though it isn&#039;t fun, a J3 can handle direct crosswinds gusting to 30 knots without requiring use of brakes. Am I missing something?
JimC
 

Brian Stout

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Jim,
The only time I use my brakes is for run up and turning around on my friends runway I always seem to miss and need a left or right brake to turn, Its a pretty narrow runway. But then anything under 100 feet wide is narrow to me *lol* Other than where else would you use them ?
 
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