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'46 Cub on Ebay C-90-12 (Possible L-4)

bob turner

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Out here, 20 grand gets a basket case. If you see all the parts bolted in place and are sure there are no corrosion issues, and the engine will actually start and run, then 20 grand sounds like a bargain. If the engine is a -12, you will need to convert it to a -8 to keep the paperwork simple. I don't much care for wood spars, but if well cared for they should not be an issue.
 

39-J3

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Could it legally be flown as an experimental?
 

jimrice

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Could it legally be flown as an experimental?
An Experimental still has minimum standards to be considered airworthy. You can't just make a certified plane into an Experimental-Amatuer Built. You can make it experimental for Demonstration, Research and Testing, etc, but there are still limitations. You aren' totally unlimited in what you can do and be legal and airworthy. Changes must still be documented and approved. It would also likely detract from the value as to ever be returned to standard category, it would have to have a conformity inspection and you would have to document EVERYTHING had been returned to original TCDS specs (or STC/337s). From what I hear, that often is a problem also.

JimR
 
P

Paul Smith

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My L-4 came from Switzerland with nothing as far as paperwork. No export C of A, no registration, no STCs or 337s, Logs from '47 to the 70's and they were in Swiss German. It has a C-90-12-F. We tore it apart and rebuilt it, applied for the paperwork, which the MIDO is going to take care of next week. Never had a US C of A, so it has to get an initial compliance inspection. Bought the STC for the -12, put in 337's for work done by "person or persons unknown."

I found out something in this process. It's no longer OK just to get the STC. You have to get a permission letter from the holder authorizing you to install the whatever it is on your specific airplane. That took some time to get the letters after the fact.

It's doable. Takes awhile, but it can be done.

Paul
 

alaskadrifter

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After reading, and rereading a bit I'm still confused ??? somewhat. What would it take for this plane to be "legal"? 'scuse my ignorance.
 

alaskadrifter

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Sounds like it could be like opening a can of worms. On the other hand, if one could get it approved seems like it could be a good deal. But from what I gather the paperwork would be a nightmare...
 
P

Paul Smith

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Not necessarily. I'd sit down with an I/A and go over your options. It all depends on what needs doing. First you'd need to get the I/A familiar with the airplane, then figure out what he needs to do. He would know this better than you. Find out what is missing from the logs. Compare the logs you have with the logs you'd like to have. It could be that you'd only need an AD check and annual. At worst you would have to check everything that isn't according to issue and get STCs and 337s for each one of those items that weren't on the airplane when it rolled out the door. Once that is done, it could be ready to go.

The trick is finding out what needs to be done.

P
 

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