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Wanted- Older J-3 for first time buyer

osgood

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Hello their, im looking for a J-3 cub. Ive been looking for about a year and i have found nothing that has struck my intrest. I am looking for a J-3 that i can pass on to my kids in the years to come. So please let me know and ill be happy to respond. Thanks for the help..
 

chuck2shaw

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Have you subscribed to the electronic version of Trade-A-Plane? They have a section just for J3s and there have been aircraft of all sorts of conditions, all over the country, advertised on there quite consistently. I bought mine from there. You get the paper version also, and I just throw that away. The online TAP has pictures of most aircraft, and far more information than is in the yellow paper. Good luck in your search. I bought a 1940 J3 (see my photo gallery) a couple years ago. Turned out the engine had a fradulent overhaul years ago, and was totally worn out with only 125 hours showing in the log. $9,000 later I have a very fine aircraft with an engine I know and trust, and it is great. Doesn't matter if I paid too much. No such thing. Find a good one, not a ratty wreck if you want to fly it and keep it a long time, and have fun.
 

Oboyett

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I know of a 38 that might be available shortly. It has just had its yearly checkup and we are currently overhauling the engine. (A-65) It is based in Sulphur Springs and its owner will be getting a Legend Cub shortly. Oran
 

osgood

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Thanks for all the advice. I didn't expect such a response. I looked in the Trader and found a few. I never thought to look in their before, i always just bought the paper edition. I also looked at the linked items and found the first one to be really nice.
I do have a question about the difference in weight from the older wooden wings compared to the metal / spared wings? Is there also a difference in the storage of the plane from one to the other? (outside/Inside/Temp difference)Thanks for the help.
 

chuck2shaw

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Here are some specs, copied from Dan Ford's website, see the links on this website. These are for the J3 with Continental A-65 engine.

Maximum Weight
Serial Nos. 7842, 7845 through 7883, and 7912 and up are eligible for 1170 lb. These airplanes are also eligible for 1220 lb. maximum weight provided the landing gear is revised in accordance with Piper Dwgs. 31472 and 31423.
Serial Nos. prior to 7912, and not listed above, are eligible for 1100 lb. maximum weight. These airplanes are also eligible for 1170 lb. maximum weight provided the lift struts and attachments are revised in accordance with Piper Dwgs. No. 12352, 13233 and 21642 and for further increase to 1220 lb, upon revision of the landing gear in accordance with Piper Dwgs. No. 31472 and 31423.
Serial Nos. 10339 and up and 2356-A and up of Model J3C-65 eligible for 1220 lb. maximum weight.

As you can see, the later J3s all have max gross weight of 1220 pounds. It is not a matter of wood or aluminum spars, it has to do with landing gear and lift strut attachment hardware, combined with what is called out in the type certificate. The ability to upgrade the landing gear and strut attachments applies only to aircraft with airworthiness certificates that say they are J3C-65s and some J3L-65s (Lycoming engines) which are covered by their own type certificate. They can be increased only to 1170 pounds, whereas some J3-C65s can be increased to 1220 pounds. J3C-65 aircraft also may be changed to Continenntal 85 HP or 90 HP engines under the original type certificate, A-691. The Franklin and Lycoming J3 type certificates do not include the option to chang to Continental engines. That has to be done with a 337, and the aircraft normally remains a J3F or L-65. However, some aircraft have had their airworthiness certificate changed to J3C-65 by the FAA, and the FAA says that is what my J3 is even if the data plate says J3F-65. More than you wanted to know...

As far as storage options, not sure what you mean. In my opinion, any fabric covered aircraft will last much longer if kept in a hangar between flights. The modern fabrics last for a great many years if kept out of sunlight most of the time. Also, keeping them in hangars reduces the chances for corrosion, rust, wood rot, damage from snow and ice, and prying eyes and fingers. By all means, plan on a hangar. Yes, I know lots of supercubs and other fabric aircraft are left outside, but the owners know the risks, and pay the price.

True "storage", where an aircraft is laid up for an indefinite period of time is a very different issue, because a number of things need to be done to protect the engine, fabric, tires, windshield, prop and other components. I have not been able to fly my J3 for a month, because of high winds, temps in the low teens, and now several inches of hard frozen sleet which has formed white cement everywhere. I don't consider it stored, but I know internal rust can be a problem with this much inactivity.
 

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