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WTB: J3, C85, Electrical

bob turner

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My arithmetic sucks, but I calculate with two 200# pilots, 12 gal fuel, one gal oil, I think you have 32 lbs left. That is enough for a radio, ADS-B, and an EarthX battery.
If you are doing student training at Reno, you need to seriously consider battery only. Carry two EarthX 680 C batteries, with capability to switch (and a voltmeter) and simply charge the one you use every evening.

I only run one student a day max, and no transponder, but I get two months out of each battery charge.

Hang a complete electrical system on a J3 and you will be a single place Cub. You do not want to run a heavy J3 out of Reno in the summertime. You will be in Washoe by the time you reach 300' below pattern altitude.
 

DesertNomad

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It is indeed a morning and fall, winter, spring airplane. In your two 200# pilots example, my partner and I together weigh about 290# and it is not an airplane for large students.

I might look at a Legend Cub or Super Cub as that I think could have another 100lbs of useful load, depending on the empty weight. The cost there is about double of course.
 

huston marlowe

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A properly equipped and restored J3 is probably 60 K or more. You can find cheaper ones, but they might not be suitable for instruction.
 

JimC

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"To fly out of a mountain airport with ADS-B out".

Why would you need an alternator or generator for that?
See Post #12.
 

DesertNomad

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"To fly out of a mountain airport with ADS-B out".

Why would you need an alternator or generator for that?
See Post #12.
I suppose a battery powered transponder would work, but it's not ideal. The airport it'd be based at is Class-C.
 

JimC

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For a J3, it would be ideal - for several reasons.
Bob Turner is an expert on this. Take his advice.

I assume that you already know that mounting an alternator or generator will permanently and substantially devalue the plane even if it is later removed.
 

huston marlowe

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Used Legend would be perfect. Designed and built to allow the classic J3 type to operate out of towered airports.
 

Ed67

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I've been flying my glider for years with a transponder and radio running off a battery (and several other pieces of avionics-about 1.5 amps draw). Look at Becker for a radio, only 50ma on receive and Trig for a transponder. The Trig is also fairly low drain as it doesn't need a heater for it's internal encoder. Total weight with wiring about 3 pounds. You can get a Li batt with 15 -20 amp hrs capacity and weighs around 5 pounds. Should get at least 10 hours of operation, probably more than you can set in the airplane. My guess is two days between charges, but do the load math. My memory cells depleted years ago. Check wings and wheels for pricing, info, etc.
 
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