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Old 08-09-2017, 09:15 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bob turner View Post
Cotton in 1979? Almost unheard of - you sure?

Hangared, even in West Virginia, should have kept corrosion manageable.
I watched a TriPacer being recovered with cotton in '79. That would be the last time I saw someone cover with cotton. It was getting pretty rare by then.


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Old 08-10-2017, 03:25 AM   #12
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There's some cotton cloth in Egypt that has lasted 5000 years.


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Old 08-10-2017, 04:29 AM   #13
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Would you use That stuff on your Cub? I had a roll of grade A laying around - it turned into dust.

My Cub was covered in '72. Ceconite. It is probably time, even for Dacron.
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Old 08-10-2017, 05:38 AM   #14
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Hi Wayne, Ill chime in here...
Ive owned a crop dusting business that also did restorations since 1988, now weve turned into more of a museum, but still do structural woodwork, welding and dope and fabric. Ive seen a bunch of people facing what your looking at, and my biggest advice is to take it slow. With a little airplane like a cub, there is just no reason to tear it down completely all at once. If you go that route, chances are itll be a long time going back together. Establish a relationship with an A&P/IA, then do the work yourself, in stages, like the elevators first. Next do the rudder and ailerons, flying in between, doing the work in your garage "off season" if you will. Ive also seen/helped guys who buy parts, repair and recover them, then sell the ones they took off. Thats a little quicker, but you can get upside down if your not buying the components right.
Anyone who has restored an airplane will tell you its not the big steps that get you, its the hundreds of little ones. You can be way down the road painting struts, fairings, inspection plates and cowlings, ect. before ever taking the wings off for recover. That is why the completion rate on homebuilts is so low... I can scratchbuild a WACO 10 fuselage and have it sitting on the gear in 2 weeks, then the next 2 years are spent doing hundreds and hundreds of small tasks while the overall look of the project remains basically the same. Most people lose interest at that point and throw in the towel.
If the tail feathers, lower door,gear legs and v struts are covered/painted, the cowlings are paimted, and you have all the parts you want (new glass, engine mount rubbers and bolts... blah blah blah)... sitting there, The upper door/window frame painted with new glass. etc etc. It will suprise you how fast it will come apart and go back together. Then do the wings one winter and the fuselage the next. The fuselage on a cub is actually the hardest part, with the floorboard and interior. You can use the experience gained on the easy stuff before doing it.
The fabric work isnt hard. Its a function of the time you put into it. Go to Oshkosh and look at the beautiful work many first timers do.
Thats my advice, fwiw,
Jim

Last edited by Tex; 08-10-2017 at 05:55 AM.
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Old 08-10-2017, 01:37 PM   #15
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I used Grade A back in the 60s. I have no problem with its use.
I've even covered the belly with the canvas bags that we drug behind us as we picked cotton. How many of us have fond memories of that? (I have the memories, but they are not fond)
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Old 08-10-2017, 02:27 PM   #16
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I recall the middle 1960's when Grade A was a common cover. If you really wanted a show plane you could substitute Irish linen in lieu of Grade A. GUP
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Old 08-10-2017, 04:09 PM   #17
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I was never abke to afford Irish linen.


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